This photo-essay documents about 2 days of experimentation that resulted in a pretty stupendous new variation on Max’s “Cabin Stove.” The overall footprint of the stove determined the firebox size, and the geometry resulted in a rectangular heat riser that took hot gasses from a vertical throat in the corner of the firebox — unconventional, but it worked amazingly well. More to come! (Ed. Note: This stove, like so many others, is merely one more in a long line of innovations and adaptations, all based on the same basic principles: burn the fuel fast, hot, & clean, and extract and store as much heat as possible prior to venting. Within this long tradition, however, valuable technical analysis and development has recently been offered by a Danish builder named Peter Vandenberg. His contribution have provided inspiration and guidance for understanding and improving the hows and whys of clean combustion. Peter offers comments at the end of the post, and is a regular contributor (along with Lasse Holmes) to an online stove forum at http://donkey32.proboards.com/.

host Max Edleson, stovers Lasse Holmes, (AK) & Kiko Denzer (OR)
We gather at fire camp in OR, hosted by Max Edleson, stovers Lasse Holmes, (AK) & Kiko Denzer (OR)
wet saw, dry covered space, bricks
shop, wet saw, dry covered space, bricks
approx. 2 parts mason's sand, 1 part clay, and a trowel or three of ash; the ash makes it buttery and easy to work -- and possibly stronger
mortar: approx. 2 parts mason’s sand, 1 part clay, and a trowel or three of ash; the ash makes it buttery and easy to work — and possibly stronger
laid up on a layer of solids, 3 bricks wide by 5 deep
bottom channels are laid up on a layer of solids, 3 bricks wide by 5 deep (classic (fibonacci) proportions!)
5" wide x 6" high, for total cross sectional surface area (CSA) of 30 sq. in.
channels are 5″ wide x 6″ high, for total cross sectional surface area (CSA) of 30 sq. in.
for maintaining flow, and should equal the CSA of the final 6" round exit flue
CSA is critical for maintaining flow, and should equal the CSA of the final 6″ round exit flue
our solids were a bit bigger than the cored bricks, which made for a nice reveal around the edge
capping layer: our solids were a bit bigger than the cored bricks, which made for a nice reveal around the edge
got laid in mortar
edge bricks got laid in mortar; cappers were dry-laid
just to be sure
measure twice: just to be sure
the mortared edge bricks provided a screed for a bed of mortar
parging, to seal the channels: the mortared edge bricks provided a screed for a bed of mortar
gasses flow in (down) at top left, turn right, then back and up at bottom left
in and out: gasses flow in (down) at top left, turn right, then back and up at bottom left
the up and down channels (vertical stacks at the end of the photo)
dry fitting the up and down channels (vertical stacks at the end of the photo)
A vertical throat/slot/nozzle in the middle of the firebox
First firebox: vertical throat/slot/nozzle in the middle of the firebox
our source for tech details: http://donkey32.proboards.com/thread/734/peterberg-batch-box-dimensions
slot size: our source for tech details: http://donkey32.proboards.com/thread/734/peterberg-batch-box-dimensions
sizing is critical to maximize turbulence and mixing of fuel and air
another view of the slot: sizing is critical to maximize turbulence and mixing of fuel and air
support a 4-brick arch, so it doesn't push the walls apart
we added extra weight temporarily to the buttresses supporting a 4-brick arch, so it doesn’t push the walls apart
lasse's quick formless technique: one person holds the bricks in place while others fill the spaces w/chips and mortar
hand made arch: lasse’s quick formless technique requires  one person holds the bricks in place while others fill the spaces w/chips and mortar
from the back of the firebox
another view, from the back of the firebox
re-cycled cast-iron plates from an old stove
setting the cooktop, which is re-cycled cast-iron plates from an old stove

20: almost there

21: it worked!
a view of where the fire comes under the cooktop
it drew OK, but wasn't 'the most inspiring firebox ever
it drew OK, but wasn’t ‘the most inspiring firebox ever
she approves!
our youngest stover approves!
drying it out on the stove top is NOT recommended practice
drying out wet paper on the stove top is NOT recommended practice
25: cooking
cooking!

 

oats, chilaquiles, yum!
breakfast menu: oats, chilaquiles, yum!

27: hot enough to cook!

a horizontal throat in the roof, at the back
Second experiment: a horizontal throat in the roof, at the back
29: ready for cooktop
ready for the cooktop

 

glass rope and mud
gasketing was a combination of glass rope and mud
Max's welding table: it warped a LOT!
We had to use Max’s welding table for a cooktop: it warped a LOT!
he says it works in his stoves (the alaska batch box)
Lasse’s full firebox method: he says it works in his stoves (the alaska batch box)
lasse said we should try the vertical slot in the corner of the firebox
third experiment: lasse wanted to try moving the vertical slot from the center to the corner of the firebox
check out that flame path!
check out that flame path!
we rebuild the stove firebox to the new design (now called the "sidewinder")
We’re sold on the new design: we rebuild the firebox in the actual stove accordingly (now called the “sidewinder”)
because we didn't have space for a square riser
we build a rectangular riser because we didn’t have space for a square one
the rectangular firebox w/corner slot may be the reason it works the way it does...
shape determines design: the rectangular firebox w/corner slot may be the reason it works the way it does…

41: final course

super sweet when what you've got fits as tho designed for your purpose
cooktop fits nice! it’s super sweet when what you’ve got fits as tho designed for your purpose

43: light it up!

to heat it up and jump start a cold wet stove
the weed burner is an emergency measure to heat up the chimney and jump start a cold wet stove
another Peterberg innovation, it directs 2dary air and maximizes turbulence
The “P-channel” is another Peterberg innovation, it directs 2dary air and maximizes turbulence
enters from the back, and gets dumped into the top of the riser at the top of the slot/throat
Secondary air enters from the back, and gets dumped into the top of the riser at the top of the slot/throat

6 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Cabin Stove 2.0 | Hand Print Press

  2. Another comment, I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist after seeing the pictures.
    The secondary air is best fed in as close to the riser as possible but certainly not inside it. This seems to be a kind of general rule, I have seen it happen in three completely different designs.
    This is what I’ve found out:
    Feeding air is best in or right in front of the port where under pressure is lowest, turbulence right after that. Also turbulence before and after the air injection wasn’t any good for the quality of the burn, rather the contrary.

    regards, Peter van den Berg

    1. Peter, thanks for your comment; it’s an honor! We have all gained greatly from your contributions to date. Lasse told us he’d be working with you at Wildacres this year, and I imagine by then Lasse will have refined the design further. I’m sorry I won’t be there myself to meet you, but meanwhile, greetings and gratitude from Oregon.

  3. Hi Kiko, beautiful pictures! You may not remember me- I took a workshop from you at Cob Cottage in May 2011. Then I moved to NC, got married and had some kids, and I’m only now getting around to building us a house. This little stove would be the perfect solution for my space, and I have an experienced mason to help me with technique, but I’d really like to see plans for this improvement in addition to your very thorough photos, and any advice for reincorporating hot water. Thank you for the essential work you continue to do!

    Kara
  4. Pingback: The Cabin Stove 2.0 - Hand Print Press

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *